Therapeutic Riding Game

New Game

This week I created a new game for one of the therapeutic riding classes I teach.  The game can be played a few different ways depending on the skill level of the group you are teaching.  The pictures making up the game are all equestrian equipment and can help students learn to identify equipment used during grooming and tacking or riding lessons.  The game is made of master sheets and smaller matching pictures.  The master sheets can be used to help guide the students to find the corresponding smaller picture.  When the smaller pictures are hung on the wall or arena fence or placed in buckets on barrels they can be used to reinforce halting skills.  Students are to halt when they see the matching picture or halt at each barrel and search for the match.  If they overshoot or undershoot their halt it is a good teaching moment for the student to understand that some horses need more preparation for the halt and some respond easily and need less strong aids for halting.

On the back of the smaller matching pictures are three directions.

Game piece matches

These directions are color coded.  Some students will only complete the blue directions, others may complete the brown or green and some may complete all three in a mini-obstacle course.  This allows for a lot of flexibility in use of the game for a variety of levels of riders, groups and skill levels.

Directions on back

Materials needed: sheets were made in Microsoft Office Word, color printer, address labels, laminating sheets, laminator,  scissors, bag or clip to keep all pieces together.

9 comments to Therapeutic Riding Game

  • Liz

    I love this activity! At my center, we use old horse calanders to do picture matching. We laminate the big pictures as well as the small versions of those pictures on the back page of the calander. Previously, we’ve used them to learn colors and markings, but next time I will add activities to the back!

    Great idea, thanks for sharing!

  • Liz,

    We also use the calendar game (as you described) for the beginners learning to halt their horses and often as a “rainy day” game to teach markings and colors. We find that both children and adult riders will play the calendar game. Thanks for telling everyone about this game. I’ll try to get some pictures of our calendar game to post.

  • This looks like a great activity for older kids who can read. My little 2 and 3 year olds enjoy stopping at either landmarks that I name on the trail or pictures hung around the arena that I ask them to choose and then stop at. Then when they stop I ask them to do an activity such as around the world, sit ups or posting 10 times.This is actually pretty high level for my kids but when they can do it-they love it.
    It is great to have another source of activities to read about on your blog. Thanks,
    Barbara
    HorseOT.com

  • Barbara,

    This is an activity for our recreational therapeutic riding classes. NARHA precautions/contraindications recommend Therapeutic riding for children with developmental skills/age four years and older for this type of program. As an OT, the younger children (under age 2 is contraindicated) are probably in your hippotherapy program? This game deals with riding skills, but you could modify it to include functional activities such as “wave Hi” or “clap your hands” type of activities in PECS pictures. I like using “card” activities that I can put in my pocket to keep moving throughout the session. Thanks for the comment.

  • Hey, nice post, really well written. You should write more about this.

  • ЎHola!
    http://www.horsescanhelp.com – da mejor. Guardar va!
    Gracias

    Garretot

  • Great site. It has been a real help for me as I deal with these things. Thanks a lot.

  • Deanne

    Great idea. I have developed something similar for my riders, but I really like the idea of additional directions on the back and the ideas for various ages.

  • sue

    Would you be willing to post the file fore the game pieces you made?-Sue

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